Infelizmente não efetuamos envios para o seu país.

veja os nossos destinos de envio

O nosso Servicenter está novamente disponível amanhã a partir das 09h00. Envie-nos um e-mail.

Difficulty: hard
These workshops are intended for experienced and skilled mechanics, who have extensive experience with sports cycles. Jobs in this category mostly require tools which need expertise to operate such as the chain whip, torque spanner or pedal spanner.
Tools: Similar Topics: Print Article

Adjusting of cockpit Mountainbike

An optimum position on the bike is crucial in achieving the maximum level of rider comfort and pedaling efficiency.

Stem height

Stem height is a crucial criterion when it comes to comfort as well as performance when riding both uphill and downhill.

A lower stem improves the stiffness when riding uphill. On the other hand, this lowered riding position requires that the rider has greater upper-body strength because he/she must invest more power to effectively maintain it. In addition, the low position on the bike reduces efficiency on the downhill because the shift in centre of gravity gives the rider the feeling he is going to be thrown over the handlebars.

A higher stem on the other hand guarantees greater comfort, superb control as well as a high level of ride safety on the downhill. On the other hand the front wheel loses traction more quickly when riding uphill and the bike rears up at the front.
It is necessary to find an acceptable compromise here. As a rule of thumb, to achieve a relatively comfortable riding position for riding uphill there should a distance of about the width of a hand between the top edge of the saddle and the handlebar grips.

TIP: The stem height has a crucial influence on the rider’s overall position on the bike. Bikers with relatively long legs and short bodies need a higher stem than “giants” with long bodies and shorter legs.
How can the stem height be adjusted? Thanks to spacers, which are fitted to all Canyon bikes as standard, it is possible to make small adjustments to the height of the stem. If the spacers are fitted under the stem then the stem is positioned higher. Picture 1 If the spacers are fitted above the stem, as shown, then a lower rider position on the bike is achieved, thereby improving performance when riding uphill. Picture 2


Several Canyon models are delivered with so-called “Flip-Flop” stems. By simply turning the stem an adjustment of stem height can be achieved. The combination of spacer tuning and turning the stem allows the rider to adjust the cockpit height of a Canyon bike by several centimeters.

The handlebar position

Most Canyon models are supplied with slightly or extremely curved handlebars. For ergonomic reasons these bars can be curved either towards the rear or upwards. Picture 3

Fine adjustments always depend on the preference of the rider; however the handlebar should be fitted according to the manufacturer’s specifications. As a rule of thumb, if you look at the handlebar from behind the bike past the saddle then the bar ends should point upwards. If you look from above down onto the handlebar then the bar ends should be pointing to the rear of the bike. Picture 4

Bikes which are primarily designed for racing and competition use are fitted with flat handlebars and also with bar ends depending on the model. Fit these so that the bar ends are pointing to the rear of the bike. The ergonomically best position for the bar ends is when they are parallel to the stem.

Warning: The handlebar is fixed to the stem by four Allen bolts. Tighten all four bolts equally when fitting and ensure that every bolt is tightened to the correct torque. When tightening bolts, please use the Canyon Torque Wrench supplied. The markings on the handlebar show you exactly the right position of the handlebar.

The Position of the brake levers

Brake lever angles

Position the angle of the brake levers so that you don’t jar your wrists when you have to apply the brakes when you’re riding uphill. This stops you from having cramps in your wrists and saves valuable energy. Picture 5

Lateral brake lever position

Modern disc brakes are designed to be actuated by two or even just one finger. Optimum leverage and power transfer is achieved when the hand is positioned as far out as possible towards the end of the lever. Many riders make the mistake of positioning the lever much too far out towards the end of the handlebar, thereby reducing brake performance and modulation. Attempt to position your brake levers as far in towards the stem as possible so that your hand is on the extreme outside of the handlebar and your fingers grip the lever on the end as shown. Picture 6

Tip: Even when using brake levers that are designed to be actuated with two fingers, try to get used to braking with just one finger because if you have your other four fingers on the handlebar this can give you that edge in critical situations.

Adjust lever reach
Lever reach on the disc brakes can be individually tailored to meet your needs. On some models that works with a little Allen key bolt, which is located on the pivot of the lever. Picture 7 With some levers this is adjust via an adjusting bolt on the brake lever. Picture 8 Picture 9

Adjust the lever reach in such a way if you need to do an emergency stop there’s still space for your hand otherwise your fingers can become trapped.

Brake contact point
It is possible to adjust the brake contact point on many types of brake.

Some Formula brakes also have a Feel Control System (FCS), with which you can adjust the brake pad clearance. Picture 10

You can also adjust the brake contact point (CR) on Avid brakes on the brake lever. Picture 11

WARNING Handlebar and stem are relevant parts for your safety.After adjusting the stem you need to re-adjust the headset. Refer to the manuals and the information here in the Tech Support Center. Ensure that all screws are tightened to the correct torque. The correct torque is indicated on the component itself, in the bike manual provided with your new bike, or here in the Technical Support Center.


Canyon consistently strives to ensure the quality and accuracy of the information contained in this Technical Support Center. Any repairs or adjustments which you carry out on your bike are entirely at your own risk. If you are in any doubt about what to do, you should send your bike to Canyon or take it to another qualified repair specialist. Canyon gives no guarantee or accepts no liability for the any of the information contained in this Technical Support Center.

Picture 1: High position of stem: the spacer are placed under the stem

Picture 1: High position of stem: the spacer are placed under the stem

Picture 2: Low position of stem: the spacer are placed above the stem

Picture 2: Low position of stem: the spacer are placed above the stem

Picture 3: The ends of the handlebar should point upwards

Picture 3: The ends of the handlebar should point upwards

Picture 4: The handlebar should point forward

Picture 4: The handlebar should point forward

Picture 5: The wrists must not bend when grabbing the brake levers

Picture 5: The wrists must not bend when grabbing the brake levers

Picture 6: The brake levers should only be pulled with two fingers

Picture 6: The brake levers should only be pulled with two fingers

Picture 7: Adjusting of brake levers

Picture 7: Adjusting of brake levers

Picture 8: Adjusting of Formula brake levers

Picture 8: Adjusting of Formula brake levers

Picture 9: Adjusting of Elixir R brake levers

Picture 9: Adjusting of Elixir R brake levers

Picture 10: Adjusting of Feel Control System for Formula brakes

Picture 10: Adjusting of Feel Control System for Formula brakes

Picture 11: Adjusting of Sram X0 pressure point

Picture 11: Adjusting of Sram X0 pressure point

Did this article help you?yesno