Mar 4, 2024 Robert Annis
Mar 4, 2024 Robert Annis

Tour de France 2024: Route, stages and TV

This year’s Tour de France promises to be a race for the ages, with excitement virtually from start to finish.

Tour de France 2024: Route, stages and TV Tour de France 2024: Route, stages and TV

The 2024 Tour de France will also be a race of firsts. For the first time, the Grand Depart will be in Italy, pedaling the home roads of famed Italian climbers Marco Pantani, Gino Bartali, and Fausto Coppi. The other major first? The grand finale will be held outside Paris for the first time ever due to preparations for the Olympic Games. Adding more intrigue, the final day won’t be a ceremonial parade lap, but a time trial that may also determine this year’s Tour winner. 

Of course, when people think of the Tour de France, the high peaks of the Alps and Pyrenees come to mind. This year’s race will include multiple epic days pitting man against monumental mountain. The initial stage will boast the most meters climbed on the first day of a Tour de France, with day four, crossing into France, hitting another high. 

The Tour peloton has never climbed so high, so early,” Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme told the media last year. 

Contents

Tour de France 2024 in numbers

  • Total distance: 3,492 km 
  • 4 countries (Italy, San Marino, Monaco, and France) 
  • 7 regions 
  • 30 departments 
  • 4 mountain ranges (Apennines (Italy), the Italian and French Alps, Massif Central, and Pyrenees) 
  • 4 summit finishes 
  • 8 sprint finishes 
  • 27 categorized climbs 
  • 2 time trials 

When is the Tour de France 2024?

The Tour begins Saturday, June 29 and ends three weeks later in Nice on Sunday, July 21. 

Where is the Tour de France Grand Départ?

For the first time ever, the Tour de France starts in Italy, with the first three stages taking place in Bel Paese (aka the Beautiful Country), before crossing over into France during Stage 4. 

What are the main storylines heading into the 2024 Tour?

Mark Cavendish (Astana) vying for stage win 35, which would break his current tie with Eddy Merckx for most TdF stage wins ever (34). 

2023 Tour winner Jonas Vingegaard (Visma-Lease A Bike) seeking his third straight TdF victory over Tadej Pogačar (UAE Team Emirates), Remco Evenepoel (Soudal-QuickStep), and former teammate Primoz Roglic (Bora-Hansgrohe). 

Will riders falling short of expectations in the early going pull the plug on their Tour de France hopes in order to rest and prepare for the Olympics road race in Paris? 

Will the final stage time trial in Nice upend the standings or will the race have already been decided in the high mountains? 

Sunflower fields line the parcours of the Tour de France 2024 Sunflower fields line the parcours of the Tour de France 2024

Tour de France Route

The 2024 Tour de France route consists of 21 stages (and two well-deserved rest days) across a variety of terrain throughout three weeks of racing. At the end of the three weeks, we'll find out the winners of the prized Tour de France jerseys

Tour de France 2024: Stage 1

Florence - Rimini, 206km, Hilly 

There’s no easing into racing at this year’s tour; from the start at Florence’s Piazzale Michelangelo, riders will tackle a race-record 3,800m of climbing on the first day. The last of those climbs will be located 25km from the finish, which, given the day’s difficulty, may not give the sprinters’ teams enough time to fully recover and regroup. Look for a rider like reigning world champion Mathieu Van Der Poel (Alpecin-Deceuninck) or Simon Yates (Jayco–Alula) to vie for the first yellow jersey of the 2024 Tour. 

  • Col de Valico Tre Faggi: 12.5km long with an average gradient of 5.1% 
  • Côte des Forche: 2.5km long with an average gradient of 6.2% 
  • Côte de Spinello: 7.1km long with an average gradient of 6% 
  • Côte de Barbotto: 5.8km long with an average gradient of 7.6% 
  • Côte de San Leo: 4.6km long with an average gradient of 7.7% 
  • Côte de Montemaggio: 4.2km long with an average gradient of 6.6% 
  • Côte de Saint-Marin: 7.1km long with an average gradient of 4.8% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 2

Cesenatico - Bologna, 200km, Hilly 

Another hilly day in Italy. The six climbs will be shorter, but steeper; the double ascent of San Luca – 10.6% gradient over 1.9km – should provide some excitement before the 10km plunge to the Bologne finish. Roglic knows the San Luca climb well, having claimed victory atop it during both the Giro dell’Emilia and the opening stage of the 2019 Giro d’Italia. 

  • Côte de Monticino: 2km long with an average gradient of 7.5% 
  • Côte de Gallisterna: 1.2km long with an average gradient of 12.8% 
  • Côte de Botteghino di Zocca: 1.9km long with an average gradient of 6.8% 
  • Côte de Montecalvo: 2.7km long with an average gradient of 7.7% 
  • Côte de San Luca: 1.9km long with an average gradient of 10.6% (twice!) 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 3

Piacenza - Turin, 225km, Flat 

The first true sprinter day. All eyes will be on Mark Cavendish and his effort to claim sole ownership of the all-time Tour wins record, but Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck) and Mads Pedersen (Lidl-Trek) will attempt to postpone Cav’s celebration. 

  • Côte de Tortone – Fausto Coppi: 1.1km long with an average gradient of 6.3% 
  • Côte de Barbaresco: 1.5km long with an average gradient of 6.5% 
  • Côte de Sommariva Perno: 3.1km long with an average gradient of 4.6% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 4

Pinerolo – Valloire, 138km, Mountain 

The peloton exits Italy and heads into the French Alps. It’s a shorter stage, but still the hardest mountain stage this early in a Tour, with long, sustained climbs of Sestrières and Galibier. After the Galibier ascent, riders must rocket nearly 20 km down to the finish line in Valloire. If the contenders are close together at the top, the day’s winner – and potential next yellow jersey wearer – will likely be the best descender of the bunch. 

  • Sestrières: 39.9km long with an average gradient of 3.7% 
  • Col de Montgenèvre: 8.3km long with an average gradient of 5.9% 
  • Col du Galibier: 23km long with an average gradient of 5.1%
Jasper Philipsen won on the Champs-Élysées at the 2022 Tour de France. Jasper Philipsen won on the Champs-Élysées at the 2022 Tour de France.

Tour de France 2024: Stage 5

St-Jean-de-Maurienne - St-Vulbas, 177km, Flat 

After the previous stage, the peloton will luckily have two comparatively easier days in the saddle, the first being this mostly flat run into St Vulbas. Unless teams completely misjudge the breakaway’s gap, you should expect to see the sprinters attempting to score some green jersey points at the end.

Tour de France 2024: Stage 6

Macon – Dijon, 163km, Flat 

Another day, another sprint finish. Which rider will, ahem, cut the mustard in Dijon? 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 7

Nuits-Saint-Georges - Gevrey-Chambertin, 25km, ITT 

Don’t expect any major fireworks during the first of two time trials at this year’s tour. With only one 1.6km climb late in the course, it’s doubtful that any of the contenders will gain or lose much time on this stage. 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 8

Semur-en-Auxois - Colombey-Les-Deux-Eglises, 176km, Flat 

The race guide may categorize this stage as flat, but there’s enough rolling terrain and punchy hills toward the end to discourage a sprint finish. This will be one of the best opportunities for a successful breakaway in this year’s race. 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 9

Troyes – Troyes, 199km, Hilly 

Cue the melodramatic music. The peloton will face 14 sectors totaling 32km of gravel roads on this stage, nearly half of which are located within the final 35km. While many hardcore gravel riders may scoff at that relatively low number, racers’ jitters are warranted; an ill-fated puncture, mechanical, or spill here could cost the contenders dearly. Van Der Poel or Wout van Aert (Visma-Lease A Bike) could go for a stage win here. 

  • Côte de Bergeres: 1.7km long with an average gradient of 5.2% 
  • Côte de Baroville: 2.8km long with an average gradient of 4.8% 
  • Côte de Loche-sur-Ource: 1.5km long with an average gradient of 5.2% 
  • Côte de Val Frion: 2.2km long with an average gradient of 5% 
  • Côte de Chacenay: 3km long with an average gradient of 4.3% 

REST DAY 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 10

Orléans - Saint-Amand-Montrond, 187km, Flat 

Look for the drama to continue into this stage; while the roads are mostly flat, wind has been known to cause havoc for riders. The contenders must be on alert if the peloton breaks into smaller echelons. Cavendish won in Saint-Amand-Montrond 11 years ago, after crosswinds caused huge time gaps in the race. Could history repeat itself? 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 11

Evaux-Les-Bains - Le Lioran, 211km, Mountain 

The first three-quarters of this stage are the calm before the storm, with the final 60km or so packing in more than 4,300m of leg-punishing climbs. It’s highly unlikely we’ll see any major attacks from the main contenders on this stage, but there should be plenty of riders vying for King of the Mountains points and the stage win. After the final summit of the Category 3 Col de Font de Cere, racers will have a very short descent to the Le Lioran finish. 

  • Col de Neronne: 3.8km long with an average gradient of 9.1% 
  • Puy Mary Pas de Peyrol: 5.4km long with an average gradient of 8.1% 
  • Col de Pertus: 4.4km long with an average gradient of 7.9% 
  • Col de Font de Cere: 3.3km long with an average gradient of 5.8% 
TdF 2024 Stage 14 brings the famous Col du Tourmalet TdF 2024 Stage 14 brings the famous Col du Tourmalet

Tour de France 202: Stage 12

Aurillac - Villeneuve-sur-Lot, 204km, Flat 

After the previous day’s mountain stage and the looming Pyrennes, most of the peloton will be content to watch the sprinters duke it out for the stage win on this day. 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 13

Agen – Pau, 171km, Flat 

The gateway to the Pyrennes and third-most visited city in Tour history, Pau always promises a fun day of racing for spectators. Much like Stage 8, the terrain for this stage in the Pyrenean foothills may be a touch too punchy for a final bunch sprint. Jai Hindley (BORA-Hansgroh) won last year’s stage ending in Pau. 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 14

Pau - Saint-Lary-Soulan (Pla d’Adet), 152km, Mountain 

One of the Tour’s most famous mountains, the 2,115m Tourmalet highlights a stage filled with nearly 4,000m of climbing. If one or more of the contenders struggles on the Tourmalet ascent, it could kill their podium dreams with two more categorized climbs to go before the Pla d’Adet summit finish.   

  • Col du Tourmalet: 19km long with an average gradient of 7.4% 
  • Hourquette d’Ancizan: 8.2km long with an average gradient of 5.1% 
  • Sant-Lary-Soulan/Pla D’Adet: 10.6km long with an average gradient of 7.9% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 15

Loudenvielle - Plateau de Beille, 198km, Mountain 

 The Bastille Day fireworks will be seen on the road this year. Perhaps the most difficult day in this year’s Tour, Stage 15 should also be one of the most exciting. The roads point up practically from the start of racing, and the finish is atop the steep, 1,780m Plateau de Beille. Look for French riders like David Gaudu (Groupama FDJ) to animate the racing today, although pulling off an elusive stage win will be more difficult. Odds are that at least one top podium hopeful’s dreams will be dashed on this day. 

  • Col de Peyresourde: 6.9km long with an average gradient of 7.8% 
  • Col de Mente: 9.3km long with an average gradient of 9.1% 
  • Col de Portet-d’Aspet: 4.3km long with an average gradient of 9.7% 
  • Col d’Agnes: 10km long with an average gradient of 8.2% 
  • Plateau de Beille: 15.8km long with an average gradient of 7.9% 

REST DAY

Tour de France 2024: Stage 16

Gruissan – Nîmes, 187km, Flat 

The last chance for the sprinters and more potential for havoc-inducing crosswinds. If Cavendish hasn’t yet won No. 35, this will surely be his final oportunity. 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 17

Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux – Superdévoluy, 178km, Mountain 

This stage is essentially one long, gradual climb, with the last 20km potentially being one of the most exciting stretches of this year’s Tour. Expect the leaders to go all out on the steep Col du Noyer climb, descend a few hundred meters, then do it again up to the Côte de Superdevoluy summit finish. 

  • Col Bayard: 6.8km long with an average gradient of 7.3% 
  • Col du Noyer: 7.5km long with an average gradient of 8.4% 
  • Côte de Superdevoluy: 3.8km long with an average gradient of 5.9% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 18

Gap – Barcelonnette, 179km, Hilly 

A short break from the high mountains, Stage 18’s rolling terrain – including a gradual climb to the Barcelonnette finish line – could make for a successful breakaway or a daring escape attempt in the closing kilometers. 

Tour de France 2024: How to watch? Tour de France 2024: How to watch?

Tour de France 2024: Stage 19

Embrun - Isola 2000, 145km, Mountain 

For the first time in 16 years, the peloton will tackle the Cime de la Bonette, the highest intervalley road in Europe and perhaps the highest point ever reached in a grand tour. All three of the day’s climbs top out above 2,000m, which will push each rider to their absolute limit. This trio of high-altitude climbs could spell trouble for Pogačar, who cracked on similar profiles each of the last two years. 

Col de Vars: 18.8km long with an average gradient of 5.7% 

Cime de la Bonette: 22.9km long with an average gradient of 6.9% 

Isola 2000: 16.1km long with an average gradient of 7.1% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 20

Nice - Col de la Couillole, 133km, Mountain 

The penultimate stage of the Tour and one of the hardest yet. The remaining podium contenders will attempt knockout blows to their competitors ahead of the final day’s time trial. 

Col de Braus: 10km long with an average gradient of 6.6% 

Col de Turini: 20.7km long with an average gradient of 5.7% 

Col de la Colmaine: 7.5km long with an average gradient of 7.1% 

Col de la Couillole: 15.7km long with an average gradient of 7.1% 

Tour de France 2024: Stage 21

Monaco – Nice, 35.2km, ITT 

It all comes down to this day. Instead of a parade down the Champs-Elysées, this stage may very well be a mad dash toward history, being the first final day time trial since 1989. After a difficult three weeks of racing, look for most competitors to try to close out their 2024 in epic style. If any of the podium contenders are within striking distance of one another, the time trial could be as competitive as that infamous Greg Lemond and Laurent Fignon battle. 

  • La Turbie: 8.1km long with an average gradient of 5.6% 
  • Col d’Eze: 1.6km long with an average gradient of 8.1%

What are the teams saying?

At the 2024 course unveiling ceremony, last year’s points classification winner Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck team) admitted to reporters that the route offered many obstacles he would need to overcome if he wished to retain his green jersey. 

There are some very difficult, short stages with a lot of elevation gain, even early in the Tour,” Philipsen said. “It was, of course, expected that there would be many mountains in the course, but they are tough climbs.” 

Even so, he’s looking forward to the 2024 Tour. 

I would like to be back, but the team makes the selection,” Philipsen said. “I will have to ensure that I am at the same level.”  

Expectations leading to the race?

Vingegaard dominated last year’s race, beating second-place (and two-time winner himself) Pogačar by 7:29. But this year, not only will Vingegaard be without Roglic’s support, the great Dane will also be racing against the Slovenian powerhouse. Roglic transferred to Bora-Hansgrohe at the end last season, and the soap opera surrounding the two should make for interesting conversation among race fans. 

But despite his competitors’ impressive palmarès and barring any unforeseen mishaps, Vingegaard will toe the Florence start line as the undisputed favorite. Even without Roglic, Vingegaard’s Jumbo-Visma team looks to be the strongest overall yet again. 

Expected to make his Tour de France debut this year, Evenepoel is already being hyped as a podium favorite. The 2022 Vuelta a España and 2023 world time-trial champion led last year’s Giro d'Italia until a positive Covid test derailed his race. He looks to make a huge splash this year, and with a few breaks, may even don the yellow jersey during the race. 

All eyes will be on Cavendish’s pursuit of his 35th TdF win, but last year’s green-jersey winner Philipsen and his Alpecin-Deceuninck squad will be tough to beat. We’ll see if Astana manages to fill Cav’s bidon from the fountain of youth. 

How to watch the Tour de France 2024

The best way to experience the Tour de France 2024 is at the actual race. But if you don’t have enough frequent flier miles to get you to Europe, then watching it on television is the next best thing. The following broadcasters will be showing the road cycling spectacle from start to finish. 

  • ITV4 (UK) 
  • Eurosport (Europe) 
  • USA Network/NBC Sports on cable; Peacock on streaming (USA) 
  • SBS (Australia) 
  • Sky Sports (New Zealand)

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  • Robert Annis
    About the author

    Robert Annis

    Robert Annis is an award-winning outdoor-travel journalist. As an experienced writer and sport enthusiast he writes content that is inspiring with focus on road biking. You might have read Robert's articles in Bicycling, National Geographic, Outside, Travel + Leisure, Inside Hook, AARP, Midwest Living, Sierra, Hemispheres, Departures, Lonely Planet, Afar, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, RV Magazine, and Hidden Compass.

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